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, it makes it hard to defend a few weeks later why the nsa programs have expanded. when you want allies on our side saying it is important that they are by our size, and then you have the president saying that the war on terror is over. apart from whatever isolationist streak i have in congress, blaming america first crowd, one of the main reasons we have a hard time maintaining support for programs like the nsa is because the president has undercut us, and mainly in a schizophrenic way. he should be out there on national tv, instead of talking about phony scandals, talk about the phony speeches he has made about is monetarism and tell us why the nsa program is so important. we are up against a situation where the people who are considered republicans, conservatives, are depending the programs of a left-of-center president who refuses to defend the program itself. but the country comes first. basisa will use that as a for the program being so essential. privacy versus security. we face an enemy which is overseas and here in our own country. it is an enemy which is willing to carry out a
have posted and explanations. so i will talk to you very thatly about the nsa, and is something i have been very involved with, trying to rein in the out-of-control nature of what is going on right now with our surveillance programs, and that is something that i have spent, as you have probably seen from the news, a lot of time doing over the past couple of months. doing himsa has been as has been declassified now, is collecting the phone records of every single person in the united states, regardless of whether you are under suspicion of anything, so, in other words, the nsa has a database, and they actually collect every time you call someone. they collect the call that was made. they tell you which numbers were connected, the duration of the call, and they keep other sorts onwhat they call metadata your calls. they have been doing this for quite some time, but it was thently disclosed, and problem, of course, is they are doing it without any suspicion. it does not matter if you have a connection to a terrorist or not. they decided that they have the authority to gather up everyone's
is not a fan of big government, i share many of those worries. i'm asked constantly about the n.s.a. stuff. i don't know enough of what's going on. but i have this guttural reaction where, no, i don't want my data scooped up vs. the analytical counterterrorism side of me saying, i want their data scooped up. there is something to be had there, a conversation to be had there. i just say that, you know, when you have that conversation, you shouldn't let it -- and i don't think you guys do this, but some people i think now are defining the current threat environment and how things are evolving around the globe with the impetus to wrap this up because they want to declare it over and an end to it. s there's a danger that you go too far in your thinking in that and think you're just going to say it's all over with because i don't want to deal with it anymore. the bottom line is our enemy gets a vote. >> we covered a lot of ground. but there's obviously still a lot of ground we could cover. let me thank our two panelists very much. [applause] and thank you all for coming and i hope to to see you ag
of you know is against the nsa program. nsa, health care, immigration reform, it is all on the table for members of congress. what is your message to them? greensboro, n.c., what do you think? >> i am calling about the town hall -- caller: i am calling about the town hall meeting that was played just prior to ,washington journal" coming on and it looked like a representative was playing to the fears of the people in the audience. i am sure that he knew what they were saying, but he was just giving vague information. one person stood up and said that his -- he took his son to the hospital because his son was beaten by a dog and he talked to different people at the hospital and the comment was, get rid of the federal government. instead of the representative addressing his concern, it did not make sense. like anperson, look elderly gentleman, said he was in favor shutting down the government's. does he realize that he is receiving any kind of social security benefits or medicare that that would be shut down, too? the representative did not explain it to him. republicans just look like
in the -- matt here.matth ols olson is the current director of ct. nt foras been general counsel the nsa, acting assistant attorney general for national security, and special counsel to the fbi director. his predecessor at the end ctc -- the nctc is mike leiter. he was the second director of the national counterterrorism center until 2011. he is now senior counselor to the ceo of the data analytics alantir technologies. he is also a national security analyst for nbc news. why don't we begin with a very ,road question, and that is what is the current state of the threat from terrorism? where does it emanate from and how serious is it? why don't we start with you? >> it is great to be here. it is daunting to talk about it. we have talked about a lot of subjects today. i will give it a shot. i would say right off of the top the threat is very different now for what it was 10 years ago and even 4 years ago. thinking at a couple of different levels. as have been noted, the threat from al qaeda and afghanistan is really significantly degrading. we do not face the same rate as the same attack as 9/11.
strike fighter program, and then a senior contributor for defense on his article on what the nsa were charged probably looks like, all of that tomorrow morning beginning at 7:00 a.m. on c-span and c-span radio, and tomorrow, a two -- they bus to her, talking about college costs syracuse, newin york, that will be live on c- hall is backe town tomorrow night. we start at 7:00 30 eastern, and education will be the education will be the focus. we hope you join us tomorrow night for c-span townhall. >> season two of first ladies begins monday, september 9 with a look at the life of edith roosevelt. all this month, we show you encore presentations of season one. every weeknight at 9:00 p.m. eastern, tonight it is lucretia garfield. ♪ >> it's only in recent years that a lot of scholarship has focused on the fact that their marriage was in its early phases. >> i think in the early years, james found her a bit distant and cold. as the years went by, she had a tremendous influence on him. >> they spent a lot of time on their children. they thought that education was an emancipating factor. >>
on a wide range of issues, including u.s.-russia relations and likely the nsa surveillance programs. indications are that he will make some sort of statement of the top of the news conference and it is likely to be about the nsa. the new york times" says at resident plans to launch new efforts. the president is endorsing a new policy panel to review surveillance powers. independent attorney to argue against the government before the surveillance courts. so some of the things that we're likely to hear but as the resident begins the news conference this afternoon. it will -- as the president begins the news conference this afternoon. after the news conference is done, we plan to open up our phones than hear from you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] afternoon, everybody, please have a seat. over the past few weeks, i have been talking about what i believe should be our priorities for the country. i am focused on the number one responsibility as commander-in- chief, keeping the american people safe. in rece
the nsa, snowden, what's the future of privacy and security issues? guest: this congress is going to take them up. we saw representtive rutchersburger was telling us yesterday before they headed home and they had a meeting at the white house to talk about the nsa that there appears to be an appetite for some type of additional layers of oversight. but we're going to see intel committee members and leadership, both parties on both sides of the building defending that nsa program. they're the people who get to read and see the things that are class fid that the rest of us don't and keep insisting the program is important and needs to be there. it will be a little bit of a fight, a disagreement moving forward. host: rod is next. caller: i had a question about congressman watt and the likelihood of him getting full enate confirmation to head the fhfa and what's so important about mel watt getting full senate confirmation? guest: i haven't been following that appointment very closely. we just saw some real stickler appointments going through the senate. he members of the nlrb, some in the e.p.
harman, and the nsa former nsansel. -- general counsel. this is one hour, 10 minutes. >> the title of this panel, as you see, is counterterrorism, national security, and the rule of law. the tension between what the law demands and what the national defense requires is, in essence, what this panel is about. we are pleased to have one of america's premier investigative journalists. mike joined nbc news in 2010 as the national investigative correspondent. we all know he covered, among other things, the boston marathon bombing and the newtown shooting massacre. he appears regularly on nbc news. he is also the author of new york times best-selling books "hubris" and also "uncovering clinton." go ahead. >> thank you. and i want to thank you again for assembling great panels every year. you get newsmakers and future newsmakers to serve on these panels. last year, i served on a panel with paula broadwell. while i do not expect any of our distinguished panelists to make news like that this year, i think they will all be in the spotlight in some form. to my left, the general counsel of the
asked about the nsa data collection program. he also got a question about same-sex marriage. here is a look. about allso worried the gay rights stuff, like i am thinking like this could be another races and a, where it is like the same thing, but gays and non-gays am a big fight and who really cares? -- does itlly matter really matter? >> that is a great point. do not believe the government should be involved in deciding who can get married. i think that is not an appropriate role for the federal government. foran appropriate role government. marriage is a private institution. i am an orthodox christian. my wife and i do not need government telling us that we can get married. nobody else needs the government telling them that they can get married. this is up to them. i agree with you. of awas a brief part recent town hall meeting. we will show you the entire event tonight starting at 5:45 earlier today, we should do an event with texas senator ted cruz and a couple of items on the agenda for republicans in the near future. he also made news of his own today related to his birth re
i concerns about this technology. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology bit.could be abused a i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are
broad new powers in 2008. "the washington post" made the analysis after getting documents from former n.s.a. analyst edward snoweden, now congress is getting involved. short time ago we talked with a reporter fouling this story. -- following this story. >> we are joined by jenifer martinez of the hill. why is judiciary committee chairman patrick leahy calling for another round of hearings on the n.s.a.? >> he's doing that in the wake of report that was published by "the washington post" late thursday, that n.s.a. had repeatedly broken privacy rules or overstepped its authority for years. soleil he came out today with -- so lie he came out with a statement today saying he remains concerned that congress is still not getting straightforward answers from the n.s.a., so he hopes to hold another hearing when congress returns to get these answers. >> how bad was this report that the "washington post" published on thursday? > it's definitely pret i damning. ust adds -- it would put the administration in even worse position than it was with the surveillance program. it also calls into question the
the nsa issue we have been facing in washington? guest: it is an interesting issue that concerns me. but it is interesting when i am home, i don't hear it much. small group ofa people. but when i am just at the coffee shop, that doesn't come up. up a lot.mes host: jake in fairhaven, massachusetts. independent line. lee terry. republican of nebraska. all her co-how is it going? -- caller: i was a going? i think the major deal as people think they should make a lot more money than they should. i think they should give a good cap scott two people working part-time -- tax cut for people working part-time jobs but not making a lot of money. get aple would want to part-time job or maybe not such a great job. i think that would put more money in their pocket. i notice when people get their tax returns and whatnot, they put all that money back into whatever -- buying a new tv or whatever. i think that would help the economy out. i talk to people and they think they should be making $20, $30 an hour because they think they deserve it. but really what i think it is, if they gave a good tax br
obama spoke about a range of issues including surveillance programs at nsa and u.s./russian relations. this is about 55 minutes. >> good afternoon. these have a seat. over the past few weeks thomas i've been talking about what i believe should be our number one priority in the country. building a better bargain for the middle class and for americans who want to work your way into the middle class. at the same time i am focused on my number one priority -- keeping the american people safe. been reminded once again about the threats to our nation. as i said at the national defense university, and meeting those threats we have to strike the right balance between protecting our security and our freedoms. as part of this rebalancing, i called for review of our surveillance programs. unfortunately, rather than orderly and lawful process, the , repeated leaks of classified information has initiated the debate in a very passionate but not always informed way. i held a healthy skepticism of these programs as a senator and as president i have taken steps to make sure that they have strong overs
. they are focused solely on the security aspect. they think as long as the nsa or some other agency is stopping bad guys, they can go after collecting information on all sorts of people and have no consequences. of course, there is a huge threat to that. we do not want the government to have this kind of data to use against americans in the future. >> yeah. also, i'm also worried about, like, all the gay rights stuff. i'm thinking, like, this could be like the racism thing. but it is like the same thing except it is between days and -- gays and non-gays. who cares? does it really matter? [applause] >> that is a great point. i do not believe the government should be involved in deciding who can get married and who cannot. that is not an appropriate role for the government. marriage is a private institution. it is between two people and their personal lives. i'm an orthodox christian. my wife and i do not need the government telling us that we can get married. no one else needs a government telling them that they can get married. that is up to them. i agree with you. [applause] yes? >> i guess my mai
. also on the show, general michael hayden, the former nsa and cia director, and an appearance by glenn downey, former executive editor of "the washington post." the sunday network tv talk shows are on c-span radio and brought to you as a public service by the networks and c-span. atin, rebroadcasts begin noon eastern with nbc's meet the week, 2:00, abc's this p.m., fox news sunday, 3:00, state of the union, and for clock p.m. eastern time, ace the nation from cbs. you can listen to them all on c- in thedio on 90.1 fm washington dc area. across the country, on xm satellite radio channel 119. -o online to c-span radio -- c spanradio.org. sort of anti-me suburb or person who thinks that everybody needs to live in new york city. i was very sensitive to coming across as an espresso-sipping, condo-dwelling elitist. that is not why i did this book. i understand why people like the suburbs. i get fed up with a lot of daily life in new york city. i was more drawn -- the trends were so undeniable, and the fact that there is a shift in the way suburban america is perceived by the people that live
fighter program. art probably nsa ch looks like. "washington journal" is live every day as 7 a.m. eastern. >> let's begin with a very well- known novelist. what brought you? thiswas born a negro in country and welcome deeply. there was no reason not to be involved what is considered the most important and most noted demonstration to free americans. until recently, like most americans, i have expressed my support of civil rights by talking largely about at cocktail parties. summer,y americans this i could no longer pay lip service to a cause that was urgently right and in a time that is so urgently now. tvsunday, american history marks the 50th anniversary of the march on washington with historic and contemporary roundtable discussions. we will have a visit to that gallery, a theater performance of the 1960s civil rights movements. it starts at 1 p.m. eastern, part of american history tv come every weekend on c-span 3. next is a discussion about the state of the u.s. economy with a former white house economic adviser and the ceo of him co-, the largest bond fund in the world, and chairman
. , after the recent leaks on the nsa, we are all concerned about privacy. stated, in my opinion, a little hysterically, the federal data is a privacy disaster waiting to happen, drawing from databases of seven different u.s. agencies, including the department of justice and the irs. i hope you can help us address some of these concerns about data hubs. first, very briefly, what are these data hubs? >> there is a single data hub. situation.important it serves as a router. the hub does not store any information. it routes information. the second point is there is no health information stored or gathered. information is involved? >> what the data hub does, if you fill out an application, that automatically, pings social security. so we verify what you are entering is a social security number, it matches you as an individual, and then it will also paying social security if you are eligible for other types of programs, which would make you ineligible for tax credits. .hen it will move it moved through each of the systems that make. homeland security. you are verifying that person is a legal ci
to show you this banner headline in the "washington journal" this morning. an audit said that the n.s.a. repeatedly broke privacy rules who has been on this story for quite some time. writes this morning that the n.s.a. overstep its legal authorities thousands of times this year -- host: back to the egypt question about aid. bob is hanging on in manassas, virginia, democrat. thank you for waiting, bob. caller: yeah, we should not pull the funding. if we do, we will support the radicals. the only stabilizing force in egypt is the military. they're western professional folks. they do not -- they're not like a third world country like the folks in south america. these guys are trying to stabilize the situation. they responded because the brotherhood was taunting them. they did overrespond, but the brotherhood after they got the -- that's going on, they went and destroyed 50 churches and christian organizations in egypt has retaliation. they're hiding in the buildings. judah is exactly correct. there should not be allowed to be empowered to the same type of folks who were in iran when they
supporting the ousted president there. repeated violations of privacy rules by the nsa thomas calling for operations of the program. at a state justice in pennsylvania has blocked a voter id law there. this is in time for the november 5 special election. journal," ahington three-hour program for you. our first 45 minutes is looking at politics, looking to you specifically on this topic am a who best represents your political party? the rnc concluding its summer meeting, talking about its future as far as 2016 is concerned. visits to iowa by joe biden. for the first 45 minutes we want to hear from the people that best represents your political party. divided the lines by political party. if you want to give us a tweet on this topic you can send that our way@c-spanwj. send us an e-mail at journal@c- span.org. couple ofurred by a different things. "the wall street journal" has a new writeup about the rnc meeting. the head of the rnc talked a little bit about the 2016 strategy. in this write up this morning, he said -- that ist abt the strategy on the republican side. on the democratic s
-- on foreign-policy, -- this headline from "the washington post" -- -- that is the nsa leaks, the former nsa staffer, edward snowden, the reporter who first worked on that. there will be more on that story in today's new york times. on our democratic line from pennsylvania. pat, we are talking the president's priorities. we have gone over a few foreign- policy issues. what do you think the top priority should be, foreign or domestic policy? the top priority should be foreign-policy. in particular, a complete disconnection from the state of israel, which we are now finding is a nation leading israeli intelligence officers. these are the american equivalent of the fbi director, cia director, who are now creating a state of israel like not to germany. when secretary kerry detained the leading state department ,fficial of the united states the statement was, at least i can go where i want now. host: where are you getting your information? caller: i know this for a fact. there are photographs of netanyahu on the walls. host: how do you know this as a fact? explain where you get your facts from. c
was the nsa and their search of the american e-mail and the compiling of metadata about the phone calls of americans. collects relations have come to light recently that there were times when the line was crossed. that demonstrates that those mechanisms were in place and the court ruling that that program was unconstitutional in 2011 and setting it aside and ending it was another example of how the process works. we have to continue to focus on striking that balance. >> missile controversy seems to have done something that a lot of people were not thought possible. that is forging a common ground between the libertarians and the liberal side of the democratic party. you get a sense that this is going to be the kind of the finding issue going forward that may be, say, the iraq war was? >> i do not have a sense that this will be a defining issue in that way. as is particularly because unlike the iraq war, where president bush was in office and very affirmatively differed with the democratic base and with face of the entire country where most americans felt that with the wrong war at the w
nation's surveillance programs have helped thwart terrorist attacks because of the n.s.a. and f.b.i. personnel who work on these activities every day and working hard to comply with the law to protect our constitutional liberties and keep america safe. and contrast to the efforts of those hardworking, law-abidinging personnel, americans have serious reservations about attorney general holder and clapper who have -- who are ultimately responsible for the management of these programs. we remain gravely concerned about their lack to follow the law, be forthright with the american people and congress, and commitment to protect our actually guaranteed liberties. continued congressional oversight coupled with the terminations of clapper and holder will help restore these fight terrorism without compromising our liberties or creating gaps in our intelligence structure. in addition the removal may start the healing process to restore america's trust in our federal government. thank you, i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. for what purpose does the gentleman from
questions about his canceled meeting with russian president putin as well as the debt ceiling and nsa surveillance. we will bring it to you live at 3:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. next, former president george w. bush on immigration during a naturalization ceremony at the bush institute on july 10. following the ceremony, the institute hosted a series of panels looking at immigrant contributions to america. this is about two hours. >> wonderful. for theu, jim, introduction. thank you, ambassador. thank you immigrants who are joining us today and thank you to our audience here and watching us. this is being streamed on bushcenter.org. thank you. mentioned weador are here in texas. this is a relevant topic. it is relevant to american nationwide. especially to those of us in the lone star state caret it is an interesting comparison. growthject is the 4% project. we are trying to get u.s. gdp doubled rate it is now. in recent times, we have been growing 2.5% per year. we know we can do better. one way we know we can do better is that in the past we have grown a lot faster. over the past4% 60
the republican party. you see it manifest in various debates. you see it in the debate about n.s.a. insure veeps -- surveillance program. you see it with aid to egypt. there's no question what rand paul is leading the movement for a very different kind of republican foreign policy. i don't know who's going to prevail in that debate. we'll know when the republicans choose a nominee in 2016. host: go to john in minnesota on our republican line. caller: i was wondering why israel doesn't get involved? we pour all the money into israel. seem like this is more concerning them than us. they just sit back and don't do anything. just take our money. it's because of dick cheney and the neocons that we can't get coalition that the rest of the world don't trust us because of iraq. host: what is israel doing now? guest: israel is doing what they ought to be doing. most of the world would want them to do is stand on the sidelines and their producting themselves and preparing themselves in case syria decides it use chemical weapons against them. i don't know anybody including critics of the president, wa
. as we all witnessed over the last few months here, with the nsa and what has happened to our computers, cell phones, and information being stored, this appears to be another technology that could be abused a bit. i think if we do not have more laws in place there could be some very serious concerns in regards to these unmanned vehicles. guest: ross, i has an individual, understand the concern from a big data standpoint about how data is collected, stored, disseminated and destroyed. that is what you are talking about. this technology, unmanned systems, has a large capacity to make everyone's life better. that is a tremendous upside you have to this technology. the technology is agnostic to the issue you are talking to. it is a different issue when talking about this capability. if you have ever had a situation with fires, floods or natural disasters -- 80% of all firefighters are volunteer. you want to make sure those men and women have the best tools for them to use when they execute the job they are given to do. in many cases, other people's lives are on the line. i understand your c
asylum former nsa contractor edward snowden. speaker john boehner also talked about the budget process in this 10 minute briefing. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> good morning, everyone. yesterday i met with the house chairman leading the investigation on benghazi. the chairman has been doing good work, much of it behind the again, but i stress once that we need to get to the bottom of what happened that terrible night, why it happened, and how we can prevent similar tragedies in the future. are also continuing to investigate the irs for its abusive power. there is nothing phony about these scandals, mr. president. when four americans are dead, not when the agency when enforcing your health care law has been harassing because of their political beliefs. the american people deserve answers and we will continue to fight for the truth, no matter how badly the administration wants to sweep these issues under the carpet. learned thatk, we our economy continues to muddle along at an unacceptable pace. this is
every website every american goes to? must be the n.s.a. i attended a classified briefing, i can't go into anything there, but it appeared before the briefing very clear to me and i still feel this way, that when you blind yourself as to who the enemy is, as we have, purging all kinds of material from our f.b.i. training materials, state department, intelligence materials, as to who radical islamists really are and what they believe, you blind our law enforcement, our security people from the ability to see your enemy. we're not protected. when you have an open border where people are coming across at will and border patrolmen have told us three to four times faster than they ever have since we started talking about handing out legal status to anybody who happened to be here by a certain date, all this talk about amnesty, citizenship, all these other things, do they get benefits? not get benefits? all this talk has increased the number of people coming in by about three to five times. the border is not secure. when you don't control what kind of terrorists may be coming into your coun
not have any further announcements. i am wanting to ask about the nsa's surveillance programs. the threat that they have identified help bolster the case that the surveillance is needed? >> i will not blend those two stories, or those two issues together. haveve a threat that we advised the public about. we have discussed with you in the media, and we are interacting with that threat. we have some issues with unauthorized disclosure of classified inspiration. -- information. we are in a debate about that. we have to protect our security, and the balance in providing security, and protecting privacy is something we are working on. we are working on what that threat represents, and how we can act against it paid we also want to ensure the protection and security of our american people here at home and abroad. i would not blend the two issues. operationally, if the aq kior is weakened, doesn't make it easier, or harder, in terms of all cried as ability to organize a worldwide attack? that some counterterrorism experts might be able to address this with greater detail. the al qaeda core a hea
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)